Traditional Wedding Vows To Pledge Your Eternal Commitment

July 27, 2020 (0) Comments

Traditional Wedding Vows To Pledge Your Eternal Commitment

Traditional wedding vows still play a prominent role in weddings these days.

The reasons are simple. You might want to take a more traditional path. Or maybe you are not sure how to describe a love that feels like the collision of stars, like dancing in the rain, like the work of divine nature in your modern wedding vows.

Either ways, traditional vows are just perfect to express your commitment to one another. The vows are not only romantic, but incredibly powerful. Passed down through generations, they can make your union timeless and more meaningful.

Here, we have compiled some marriage vows from major religions around the world. Use these to give words to your irrevocable love and unceasing faithfulness. And you can use them as inspiration as you write your own wedding vows.

Catholic Wedding Vows

Marriage is one of the most significant events in the life of a Catholic. It is also one of the seven sacraments of the Church. There are two sets of wedding vows approved by the Vatican for American Catholic weddings. Both go like this with a slight variation of phrases here and there:

I, ______, take you, ______, to be my lawfully wedded (wife/husband), to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, until death do us part.

traditional catholic wedding vows

Protestant Wedding Vows

Traditional Protestant Wedding Vows

Traditional Protestant wedding vows are the ones that you come across the most. There are various Protestant churches that practice their own wedding traditions with slight variations. The most common vow used in Protestant weddings is:

In the name of God, I, ______, take you, ______, to be my (husband/wife), to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are parted by death. This is my solemn vow.

Other types of Protestant wedding vows are as below.

Traditional Episcopal Wedding Vows

In the name of God, I, ______, take you, ______, to be my (wife/husband), to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are parted by death. This is my solemn vow.

Traditional Episcopal Wedding Vows

Methodist Wedding Vows

In the name of God, I, ______, take you, ______, to be my (wife/husband), to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are parted by death. This is my solemn vow.

Or you can use one of the following vows:

In the name of God, I, ______, take you, ______, to be my (wife/husband), and I promise before God and all who are present here to be your loving and faithful (husband/wife) as long as we both shall live. I will serve you with tenderness and respect, and encourage you to develop God’s gifts in you.

______, in the name of God, I take you to be my husband (wife) from this time onward, to join with you and to share all that is to come, to give and to receive, to speak and to listen, to inspire and to respond, and in all our life together to be loyal to you with my whole being, as long as we both shall live.

Presbyterian Wedding Vows

I, ______, take thee ______, to be my wedded husband/wife, and I do promise and covenant, before God and these witnesses, to be thy loving and faithful wife/husband; in plenty and in want, in joy and in sorrow, in sickness and in health, as long as we both shall live.

Lutheran Wedding Vows

I, ______, take you, ______, to be my husband/wife, and these things I promise you:
I will be faithful to you and honest with you;
I will respect, trust, help and care for you;
I will share my life with you;
I will forgive you as we have been forgiven;
and I will try with you better to understand ourselves, the world, and God;
through the best and the worst of what is to come as long as we live.

Lutheran Wedding Vows

Buddhist Wedding Vows

Traditional Buddhist wedding vows sound much like the Catholic wedding vows where each partner willingly gives oneself to the other. Couples say the Buddhist vows in unison or read them silently in front of a shrine consisting of a Buddha image, candles and flowers. Often an officiant reads out the vows for the couple who respond to them in unison. An example of a Buddhist wedding vow is as follows:

Officiant: Do you pledge to preserve and enrich your affection for each other, and to share it with all beings? To take the loving feelings you have for one another and your vision of each other’s potential and inner beauty as an example and rather than spiraling inwards and becoming self-absorbed, to radiate this love outwards to all beings?

Bride/Groom: We do.

Buddhist Wedding Vows

Hindu Wedding Vows

In a Hindu marriage ceremony, there are seven marriage vows, known as Saptha Padhi. They are spoken by a priest in Sanskrit and they cover all the elements of a marriage.

Let us take the first step to provide for our household a nourishing and pure diet, avoiding those foods injurious to healthy living.

Let us take the second step to develop physical, mental and spiritual powers.

Let us take the third step to increase our wealth by righteous means and proper use.

Let us take the fourth step to acquire knowledge, happiness and harmony through mutual love and trust.

Let us take the fifth step so that we are blessed with strong, virtuous and heroic children.

Let us take the sixth step for self-restraint and longevity.

Finally, let us take the seventh step and be true companions and remain lifelong partners by this wedlock.

Hindu Wedding Vows

Jewish Wedding Vows

In a traditional Jewish wedding, the groom says the following words in Hebrew as places the ring on the bride’s index finger:

Haray at mekudeshet lee beh-taba’at zo keh-dat Moshe veh-Yisrael.

English transliteration: Behold, you are consecrated to me with this ring according to the laws of Moses and Israel.

Then they recite the seven blessings, known as Sheva Berakhot.

Traditional Jewish Wedding Vows

Muslim Wedding Vows

In Muslim weddings, most couples do not recite vows, in fact a cleric speaks of the meaning of marriage and the couple’s responsibilities toward each other and to Allah. In response to the cleric’s words, the couple consents to accept each other. However, some Muslim couples do recite their vows and a common example is as follows:

Bride: I, (bride’s name) offer you myself in marriage in accordance with the instructions of the Holy Quran and the Holy Prophet, peace and blessing be upon him. I pledge, in honesty and with sincerity, to be for you an obedient and faithful wife.

Groom: I pledge, in honesty and sincerity, to be for you a faithful and helpful husband.

Traditional Muslim Wedding Vows

Traditional wedding vows are an emotional and personal part of every wedding ceremony. Regardless of your choice, wedding vows from any faith or culture create a sense of companionship and eternal love for the couple. So, choose the one which resonates with your feelings the most and pledge your devotion and love on your big day!

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